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On my bedside table. . .

  • Jojo Moyes: The Ship of Brides: A Novel

    Jojo Moyes: The Ship of Brides: A Novel
    Because why wouldn't I read another novel by Jojo Moyes? I don't know that I have ever read quite so many books by the same author, but I am hooked on her! I liked this one a lot too . Of course, it's a novel, but it is based on historical events. Set post World War II, the ship of war brides makes its way across the sea to the US. It mirrored the actual trips taken in 1946 and 1947 to bring Australian warbrides to the US. Good light read!

  • Abby Johnson: Unplanned: The Dramatic True Story of a Former Planned Parenthood Leader's Eye-Opening Journey across the Life Line

    Abby Johnson: Unplanned: The Dramatic True Story of a Former Planned Parenthood Leader's Eye-Opening Journey across the Life Line
    Beyond covering protests for the college radio and tv stations, I don't think I ever have given much thought to Planned Parenthood. I learned a lot in this book about a topic that I did not know much about and it spurred me to go and do a lot more reading on the whole Planned Parenthood /abortion topic. Opened my eyes quite a bit.

  • Laura Hillenbrand: Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption

    Laura Hillenbrand: Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption
    I read this one several years ago and it remains to be one of the best books I have read in years. Louis Zamperini had strength and tenacity beyond measure. I was completely captivated with all that he experienced -- good and bad -- and eventually plan to watch the movie. I hope it is as good as the book!

  • Gayle Forman: If I Stay

    Gayle Forman: If I Stay
    Yes, I know. . . a book for teens. How will I know if it is okay for Leah to read if I don't read it? It was sad. I might have cried. I might have even watched the movie months later and cried too. Just maybe.

  • Melanie Benjamin: The Aviator's Wife: A Novel

    Melanie Benjamin: The Aviator's Wife: A Novel
    I really enjoyed this one a lot and in fact, like so many other books I read, it made me go read a bunch on real stuff on Charles Lindbergh and his wife. What interesting people!

  • Andy Andrews: The Noticer: Sometimes, all a person needs is a little perspective

    Andy Andrews: The Noticer: Sometimes, all a person needs is a little perspective
    This is a very quick read and I am sure that if there were a movie made from this one, it would star Morgan Freeman. A nice one to make you think for a minute.

  • Jojo Moyes: One Plus One: A Novel

    Jojo Moyes: One Plus One: A Novel
    Oh goodness, went on a bit of a serial binge reading event with Jojo Moyes! I didn't enjoy this one as much as the previous one by her, but still like the quirkiness of each of the characters.

  • Jojo Moyes: Me Before You

    Jojo Moyes: Me Before You
    I really, really liked this one! I enjoyed the other one I read by Jojo Moyes -- The Girl You Left Behind -- and this was much the same. Interesting characters, a good storyline and one of those that I could have kept reading more if the book had kept going! I will read more by Moyes!

  • Gillian Flynn: Dark Places

    Gillian Flynn: Dark Places
    So when I purchased Gone Girl, I accidentally purchased three of the author's books and this is the second one. Even darker than Gone Girl. I have the third on my kindle, but I don't know if I want to read about more murder. The characters are so shady . . . I feel like I need to take a shower after reading!

  • Gillian Flynn: Gone Girl

    Gillian Flynn: Gone Girl
    As usual, I am years behind what everyone else has already read! This one was dark, a little too dark for me. And kind of written simply -- I am sure I will get around to seeing the movie one day and that might be one where the movie is better than the book.

  • Jojo Moyes: The Girl You Left Behind: A Novel

    Jojo Moyes: The Girl You Left Behind: A Novel
    This was the first book that I read by this author and I really enjoyed it. I will definitely read more by her, well written and interesting!

  • Markus Zusak: The Book Thief

    Markus Zusak: The Book Thief
    One of the best books I've read this year! I really enjoyed this one and eventually will have to get around to seeing the movie. I heard it was pretty good.

  • Beth Moore: Feathers from My Nest: A Mother’s Reflections

    Beth Moore: Feathers from My Nest: A Mother’s Reflections
    Very much a mother's memoir. An interesting read, but a little too preachy at times. (I guess that makes sense, considering who she is!) It's a good reminder that we are responsible for raising kids to become responsible, kind, caring Christian adults.

  • Lois Lowry: The Giver (Readers Circle (Laurel-Leaf))

    Lois Lowry: The Giver (Readers Circle (Laurel-Leaf))
    A friend really liked this one. . . I didn't so much. It was a Newberry Medal Winner. . . but it still didn't do much for me. A 12-year old lives in a community of conformity. He is given the responsibility of becoming the keeper of all memories and he learns too much about his community. It's a young adult novel. . . but I'm not sure it would hold my kids' attention.

  • Lois Lowry: Number the Stars

    Lois Lowry: Number the Stars
    Leah and Jackson read this one for school and Leah kept telling me that it was really good and I should read it. It is set in 1943 and tells the story of a Jewish family escaping Denmark during the Holocaust. The story is told from a 10 year old's perspective. It was a quick read and a great book 4th - 6th graders.

  • Donna Tartt: The Goldfinch

    Donna Tartt: The Goldfinch
    Took me months to get through this one. Not because it wasn't interesting, instead I just haven't had a lot of time for reading as of late. This turned out to be a very interesting story, with plenty of great characters and tied together story lines. Worth the time to read it. It reminded me of the Dragon Tattoo series.

  • John Green: The Fault in Our Stars

    John Green: The Fault in Our Stars
    A friend mentioned that her teenage daughter had recently read it and my friend did too. She said it was a sweet story and worth the read. It really was. It's the story of two young teens, both dealing with life-threatening illnesses. A sweet, but sad love story. Then, at Christmas, I found that both of my nieces were reading it and that a movie is being made sometime this year. That will be one that I will probably want to see.

  • Stephen James: Wild Things: The Art of Nurturing Boys

    Stephen James: Wild Things: The Art of Nurturing Boys
    If you are raising a boy, this is a great read! Boys are so completely different than girls -- energy, needs and how their brains work. I am always looking for ways to understand them a little more. I can definitely see my boys in the different descriptions of stages they go through and I am sure this book is one that I will reach back out to as they grow to the next ages and stages.

  • J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire

    J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire
    Trying to read them with Jackson. . . but man, oh, man these are long. They are interesting, but not enough to hold my attention. Not sure I can finish the series.

  • Lisa Graff: Umbrella Summer

    Lisa Graff: Umbrella Summer
    Perfect for a 9-12 year old girl! Leah got this in her Easter basket and quickly went right through it. She kept telling me how good it was, so I went ahead and read it too. The main character, Annie, tries to move forward in life after her brother unexpectedly died. It's a sweet story where she learns to let go of her worries and start living again.

  • Kathleen Grissom: The Kitchen House: A Novel

    Kathleen Grissom: The Kitchen House: A Novel
    A sad story, but well told and captivating. A young white girl from Ireland ends up on a slave plantation in Virginia. She is placed with the slaves in the kitchen house, but life unfolds very differently for her compared to the slaves. Definitely an interesting and well written story.

  • Olive Ann Burns: Cold Sassy Tree

    Olive Ann Burns: Cold Sassy Tree
    Somehow I missed this one along the way. It is an older book. I liked it because it is set in a small town in Georgia (like ours) and it is fun to see how people live back in the early 1900's. An interesting story line with believable characters and an easy read. Apparently, there was a movie made from it years ago too.

  • Katrina Kenison: Mitten Strings for God: Reflections for Mothers in a Hurry

    Katrina Kenison: Mitten Strings for God: Reflections for Mothers in a Hurry
    One of my favorite authors! One of the best parenting books I have read and it isn't really a true "parenting" book. She shares her experiences and observations while raising her two boys. She never tells you how to do it, just how she did it and how it worked. (Exactly how my mother-in-law shared parenting advice). One thing I have done since reading this book was to go back to reading books aloud with the kids. Once they each became great readers, that went by the wayside. We might all pile in my bed together and read, but we are all reading something different and silently. This week, John and Owen and I have piled in my bed and taken turns reading from a book. We finished it over 5 nights and it was a lot of fun. They loved the one-on-two time and I enjoyed hearing them read! I also have her latest book, but haven't read it yet!

  • Ian McEwan: Sweet Tooth: A Novel

    Ian McEwan: Sweet Tooth: A Novel
    The first third of this British spy novel was so slllloooooowwww and too many confusing details that I put it down more times than not. But, once it picked up, I really enjoyed it. An ending that I didn't at all expect and I'm glad I stuck with it!

  • Wendy Wan-Long Shang: The Great Wall of Lucy Wu

    Wendy Wan-Long Shang: The Great Wall of Lucy Wu
    Another book I read along with Leah and Jackson for school. Good book. Was one of Leah's favorites. Lucy Wu goes from sharing a bedroom with her older sister to sharing it with a Great Aunt from China. We all learned about some Chinese customs too!

  • Nancy Pickard: The Scent of Rain and Lightning: A Novel

    Nancy Pickard: The Scent of Rain and Lightning: A Novel
    Ugh -- not a favorite at all! I didn't like the author's style. She described every thought that every character had at every moment. Too much thought and left little for me to speculate on my own.

  • Abraham Verghese: Cutting for Stone

    Abraham Verghese: Cutting for Stone
    A long one. . . I didn't think I would make it through the first 100 pages, but after that, I didn't want to put it down. There is a lot of history involved and while interesting, I had to skim parts of it to not get bogged down in the details. A great story and a great read!

  • Kristen Landon: The Limit

    Kristen Landon: The Limit
    Interesting concept -- the government sets a personal debt limit for each family. If a family goes over their debt limit, then the government removes the oldest child from the family and takes them to a special workhouse to work off their family's debt. The story focuses on one family and a young man's struggle to understand the process.

  • Joan Bauer: Close to Famous

    Joan Bauer: Close to Famous
    Another Reading Bowl book. A 12-year old and her mom make a break from Memphis and an abusive boyfriend. They land in a small town in West Virginia and meet a cast of characters who all play their special part in helping the 12-year old grow. An easy read and one that Leah really liked.

  • Mark Childress: One Mississippi

    Mark Childress: One Mississippi
    I love southern writers. My favorite, undoubtedly is Rick Bragg, but I really enjoy almost all books written by southern writers. I just finished reading this one by Mark Childress and I liked it. Not an earth-shattering plot, but an interesting one. Set in Mississippi in the 60's, a white boy falls for a black girl who after a brain injury, thinks she's really a white girl. Meanwhile, he has a jealous best friend who lets lies and jealousy and hatred take over and destroy his and several other lives. I liked the writer's style. . . looking forward to reading some of his other ones.

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